Macs-241

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Jun 27, 2022
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Warning to all members - Remote access scams costing victims tens of thousands...

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Hang up on remote access scammers​

Criminals who contact you unexpectedly offering to help 'fix problems' with your account, phone or computer are causing increasing financial loss through remote access scams.

Professional-sounding scammers ask you to download well-known screen-sharing (or remote desktop application) software. They then use this software to steal from you.

Australians reported losing $15.5 million to these scams in 2023, with criminals stealing averages in the tens of thousands of dollars.

Australians over 65 years old are losing the most money in these scams.

How to spot the scam​

  • You get an unexpected phone call from someone telling you there's a problem with your account, phone, or computer.
  • They may pretend they're calling from a well-known bank, internet, phone, software or web security business and they can help you 'fix the problem'.
  • They tell you to download software or an app which will let them remotely control your computer or mobile phone.

How the scam works​

  • When you download the software or app they say they need to 'fix the problem', the scammer can now fully control your device.
  • They don't fix any problem, because there's no problem to fix.
  • They ask you to tell them your banking passwords or one-time security codes.
  • Sharing these lets the scammer access your bank accounts, personal information and steal your money.
  • You might not realise they have stolen your money and emptied your bank accounts until the next time you log in.

Protect yourself​

STOP – Don’t rush to act. Hang up on anyone asking you to download software or an app over the phone. Never provide banking information, passwords, or 2-factor identification codes over the phone.

THINK – Ask yourself if you really know who you are communicating with? Take the time to call the business you're dealing with using independently sourced contact details, or check you're talking to a real employee using their secure app.

PROTECT – Act quickly if something feels wrong. If you've shared financial information or transferred money, contact your bank immediately. Help others by reporting to Scamwatch.

If you've been affected​

  • If you have lost money, contact your bank or financial institution immediately.
  • If you've had personal information stolen or need support to recover from a scam, contact IDCARE on 1800 595 160.
  • Help others by reporting scams to Scamwatch.
  • Tell your friends and family: you can share your experience, get support and help to protect others from scams.

Who is the National Anti-Scam Centre?​

The National Anti-Scam Centre is where government and industry work together to protect Australians.

We’re harnessing shared resources and smarter analytics to cover blind spots, strengthen weak links and use data to react faster, stopping scams before they happen.
Our aim is to make Australia a harder target for scammers.
For more information about how to avoid or report a scam, visit the Scamwatch website.
We send these alerts to tell you about new scams and how to avoid them. We don't use links in these emails. Not clicking on links in emails and messages is one of the easiest ways to protect yourself from scams.
You have received this email because you have subscribed to receive Scamwatch scam alerts issued by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

If you have any doubts about an email's source, verify the sender by independent means - use their official contact details to check the email is legitimate before clicking on links or opening attachments.
Copyright © 2024 Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, All rights reserved.

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SIMPLE!
If you take a call like this there is no need to hang up immediately.
Just string them along to annoy them.
If you are stupid enough to download anything at the request of any unknown person from an unsolicited phone call then you are a complete fool and deserve to lose your life savings!
 
I do not have a mobile Phone all my calls are answered by an operator who asks Them who they want to speak to and who his calling, then they ring me and tell me who is calling if I want to speak to them press 1 no press2, I can get 5 or 6 calls a week where the persons put down the phone when asked who is calling.
 
I had one like that some time ago and the (smooth) operator wanted me to download some remote desk program or other and because of his horrendous pronunciation I couldn't understand him so he hung up on me. It was then the penny dropped loud and clear that I was being taken for a fool.
How lucky was I? It could have been disastrous except for his poor pronunciation.
I have not done anything as stupid since. I usually just hang up now.
If huz gets one he gives them a few choice expletives :ROFLMAO:
 
I don't have any emails or banking informaion on my phone, I had some bloke contact me a few weeks ago saying that he was from my phone service provider that I issue with the phone and he would fix it remotely that I needed to download any desk that told me immediately it was a scam as any desk gives them access to everything on your device.
NEVER DOWNLOAD ANY DESK IF SOMEONE YOU DON'T KNOW ASKED YOU TO IS A SCAM.
Anyway after a few minutes of access to the phone that had no information that he could use to scam me he advised me that he could not solve the issue and hung up. CARMA in action that was one I won.
 
This was a scam that started at the very beginning of scams ,I got one and knew something was wrong so contacted my provider and it was. After that I just hung up the phone because they came thick and fast.Still get scams but haven't got a computer anymore just a tablet so they come in by emails which are pretty easy to spot
 
I have a whistle beside my home phone and as soon as I know it is a scam the caller gets a blast from the whistle. I don't get a scam call for a few weeks and when I do, repeat the above. I don't give out my mobile number to just anybody and haven't received any scam calls on the mobile. Did you know that companies sell on their 'gathered information' to tele-marketing companies etc. I was going to buy some cancer charity tickets at a 'pop-up' in the shopping centre. When filling out the coupon the lady asked for my mobile number to be put on the ticket stubb. I told her I only had a home phone and she informed me that their 'legal department' had informed the ticket sellers that only a mobile was acceptable as it was 'illegal not to put a mobile number otherwise the charity group could not contact them. I said that my home phone has a message recording facility and they can leave a message. She insisted that I provide a mobile number, I told her to provide me the Act and Section that this 'compulsory law' was under. She then phoned her supervisor and after a brief conversation she accepted my home phone number. It was either that or the non-sale of the tickets which I had already filled out. It seems that the sale was 'more important' than breaking the law? This is what happens to your info, so don't just BLINDLY COMPLY...... FIGHT BACK.
 
This is not a new scam. I had a call some 20 years ago while on my computer. He wanted me to do this and that, and because I was not very up with stuff at that time, I said I'd have to ask hubby. He kept pushing and I kept saying no. Eventually one of us hung up.
So anyone by now should know not to do it.
 
I do not have a mobile Phone all my calls are answered by an operator who asks Them who they want to speak to and who his calling, then they ring me and tell me who is calling if I want to speak to them press 1 no press2, I can get 5 or 6 calls a week where the persons put down the phone when asked who is calling.
More info please, Dennis.
 
I do not have a mobile Phone all my calls are answered by an operator who asks Them who they want to speak to and who his calling, then they ring me and tell me who is calling if I want to speak to them press 1 no press2, I can get 5 or 6 calls a week where the persons put down the phone when asked who is calling.
Good on you.
How much does that service cost you?
 
I am with telecom, a few years ago when my wall phone broke down, I bought my own phone, in the instructions book tells you how to get that system, I pay $115 a month which includes my computer usage, This is what the phone was called, Telstra call guardian 302 Corded Phone, but I suppose a newer model has replaced it, a call to Telecom would solve the problem, over the years it has saved me problems Thanks for your interest Dennis.
 
I have a whistle beside my home phone and as soon as I know it is a scam the caller gets a blast from the whistle. I don't get a scam call for a few weeks and when I do, repeat the above. I don't give out my mobile number to just anybody and haven't received any scam calls on the mobile. Did you know that companies sell on their 'gathered information' to tele-marketing companies etc. I was going to buy some cancer charity tickets at a 'pop-up' in the shopping centre. When filling out the coupon the lady asked for my mobile number to be put on the ticket stubb. I told her I only had a home phone and she informed me that their 'legal department' had informed the ticket sellers that only a mobile was acceptable as it was 'illegal not to put a mobile number otherwise the charity group could not contact them. I said that my home phone has a message recording facility and they can leave a message. She insisted that I provide a mobile number, I told her to provide me the Act and Section that this 'compulsory law' was under. She then phoned her supervisor and after a brief conversation she accepted my home phone number. It was either that or the non-sale of the tickets which I had already filled out. It seems that the sale was 'more important' than breaking the law? This is what happens to your info, so don't just BLINDLY COMPLY...... FIGHT BACK.
When donating and a phone number is a must that does it for me. There's no need for phone numbers unless you can win something
 
If I don’t know the number and it’s not in my contacts, I do not answer the call
If it is important, they will leave a message and then I can decide to call them back if it’s somebody that I need to talk to
That way, no scammer will get through
 
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