5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!



2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.



4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

 
Last edited:
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Ezzy

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5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
Remember the egg beater & flower sift. Mum also had a bean cutter, pea shelled & of course meat grinder which we used for veggies for stews too. Ahh the good old days!
 

majewski

New member
Dec 27, 2021
2
6
3
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
I still have an egg beater plus the meat grinder.
 
  • Like
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Rod Iffinger

New member
May 25, 2022
4
3
3
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
I still have and use a cheese slicer, flour sifter and meat grinder. These are still readily available! I generally use an electric whisk but have a couple of traditional hand whisks for some delicate tasks where a few extra seconds with the electric one can ruin the ingredients.
 
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Tricia56

Member
Dec 24, 2021
48
70
18
I still have a sifter (#5 on your list). Also still available at most supermarkets and department stores. Also at specialty stores.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ezzy and Ricci

Nana P

New member
Oct 2, 2021
18
20
3
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
I still have a flour sifter and the hand beater.
 
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Reactions: Ezzy and Ricci

JayKay

Well-known member
Oct 15, 2021
692
1,467
93
Eastern suburbs, Melbourne
I guess I am classified as ancient, I used all these ancient gadgets from my Mum's kitchen.
I don't mince the meat anymore, but I still have it from my grandmother who died in 1941.
I still use the egg beater occasionally, if there is a blackout.
The wires on the cheesecutter have become very frail, so I don't use it.
My newer flour sifter has 3 layers of mesh, so my ingredients are triple sifted.
The old rusted sifter went to the sand pit!
 
Last edited:
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Algieboy

Member
Dec 22, 2021
76
78
18
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

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2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

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4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
 

Joydie

Active member
Dec 8, 2021
83
242
33
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
I no longer have the meat grinder, but I still have the sieve and the cheese slicer. When I was a kid, I had the strongest arms in Wingham from using the butter churn. 😂
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ezzy and Ricci

Pacapam

Member
Jan 15, 2022
18
27
13
5 ancient kitchen gadgets that would boggle the minds of today's youth


Kids these days with their smartphones and tablets, they just don't know how good they have it! If only they could see some of the ancient kitchen gadgets that their grandparents used, they would be truly amazed. Here are five of the most fascinating (and slightly bizarre) kitchen gadgets from history. We encourage you to share a few of these pics with your grandkids and see if they can guess what they are!


1. The butter churn

This gadget was used to make butter from cream, and it would have been a real workout for the arms! The cream would be placed in the churn and then churned using a plunger-like device until it turned into butter.

Without getting into the details, butter churns have actually been around in one form or another for 8000 years! The crank driven ones we’re more familiar with date back to the 18th century.


cgRLJ3BQhM6Be9br3GRZl1Jx6kgX6Wf-hDbHbiRW27U91XHbOegzziHMV0Elso3z7y6gTqG08ODY4toFdBr0zz6IoePmi0jxV3ekUTA1mg9aPmuq3cyf3Fi88C1y7Z1JCCSoZvjT_LpgA-jdPg

Credits: eBay

According to Wikipedia, one particularly novel invention of note was the rocking chair butter churn. This device, invented by Alfred Clark, consisted of a barrel attached to a rocking chair. While the rocking chair moved, the barrel moved and churned the milk within into butter. That’s what we call working smart instead of working hard!

[firstad][/firstad]

2. The old-fashioned eggbeater

Unlike the more fancy-shmancy modern versions which are powered electrically, the one we grew up with was operated by hand. This meant a lot of elbow grease was required to get those eggs beaten into submission!


VhLupMqjJ4oSlMKxVuS9BtzMIZZav-cmqnf5o4ZqZyksA29O17WL60YXYZLZRAoH4gp2YgS9lc49_VhDabUyzkN3yI3wv0jhAVMzt9yPT3cUknCYef0L-mKwKAn43EoyYr6Kjn5y1AD18QVnjQ

Credits: eBay

The first eggbeaters were powered by cogs and gears, and they date back to the late 19th century. According to the BBC, Willis Johnson, first patented the eggbeater in 1884. Originally he intended the device as a mixing machine not intended to whisk the eggs only.

3. The meat grinder

This is a gadget that would have been found in almost every kitchen in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was used to grind meat, usually beef, pork or lamb, into smaller pieces which could then be used in recipes such as sausages, pâtés or meatloaves.

The meat grinder would have been clamped to a table or work surface, and then the meat would be placed into the funnel-like top. A handle would be turned which would then force the meat through a metal plate with small holes, effectively mincing it.



8hyr8TwqT9c4wJlCLdhakC27IsoUIlV8EO8VGB8_-EO30on9Mr6ksPszratmgS3eMZts3Qh7i_HvirulOrrzN9nlUQFyvk_rz6OcoojROLDnwgIwqaQUX2xB1b5MiDJUOsDKwTB9Le87WQx6WQ

Credits: eBay

As Wikipedia notes, the first meat grinder was invented in the nineteenth century by Karl Drais. The earliest form of the meat grinder was hand-cranked and forced meat into a metal plate that had several small holes, resulting in long, thin strands of meat.

[nextads][/nextads]

4. The cheese slicer

This gadget, which at first glance might look like some kind of torture implement, was used to slice cheese into thin pieces. It was particularly useful for slicing hard cheeses such as cheddar or Parmesan.

3NqFvOuSBcpxXwoK9lUEiF7BsnG09cbDsy7WYaOgAr99EVD4hbqeG-gSJMh84fEAA_aTqDl5Twf0ynAupkJXOZKayZylX2rqHzOy2k33JwpiIXJiHjcsKR_sI9hLAi5nVoYL5tsuzjHjooG7nA

Credits: eBay

There were several different forms of the device. Some used simple guillotine type mechanisms, while others would have a wire attached to a handle, which could be tensioned. The cheese would be placed on a cutting board and the wire then pulled across it, resulting in nice, even slices of cheese.

5. The flour sifter

This gadget was used to sift flour, as the name suggests, but it was also useful for sifting other ingredients such as sugar, cocoa powder or baking powder.


hhVDKaA-0GvY5ADkl8cwngooteeBEYj3tEIeRknnWfC27nIanGZX-pkXuv-w5kDyf3LVfMXQbDLLo6z3Lki9EobJVpeeE9WIZe2D83y7DRofsWDNXOsSg8M9iCuEipxtrnSB61NZ-WDOmNUuaA

Credits: eBay

The flour sifter would have a metal mesh screen on the bottom, through which the flour would be sifted. This would remove any lumps from the flour and make it finer and easier to use in baking. Some models had hand cranks which could be turned to rotate the mesh screen and sift the flour more effectively.

So there you have it, five ancient kitchen gadgets that we think would absolutely flummox the average millennial or zoomer. We hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane! Did we miss any other kitchen gadgets that would have confused the grandkids? Let us know below.

[nextads][/nextads]
But, but, but…. There still is an eggbeater, flour sifter, & meat grinder in my Mim’s kitchen here! No electricity , no batteries required, light weight ( not the meat grinder), take up very little space in the cupboard. Might be other “ handy self sustaining environmentally friendly tools “ in the cupboard too…. Will have to have a rummage… ah hah! I know there’s a nice glass lemon/citrus juicer ( with designed in seed catchers). 😁
 
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Reactions: Ezzy and Ricci
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