Are you ignoring these crucial signs of hearing loss?

As we age, our hearing often changes gradually without us even realising it. But failing to notice the subtle signs of hearing loss* could have serious consequences.

But what exactly should you be looking out for? And how much is normal ageing versus a problem that requires attention? We did some research to learn the signs you cannot afford to brush aside*.



Are you struggling to hear in groups or noisy places? If conversations at family gatherings, events or restaurants are suddenly too challenging, it’s time for a checkup*.

Our ability to hear well in challenging environments diminishes as loss progresses, and catching loss early means treatments work better.

Has anyone ever told you that the television is blaring, but it sounds normal to you? One sign of degraded hearing is turning up the TV 'too loud’. Our brains compensate at first, so we may not perceive our own hearing loss. This is another sign that it’s time for a checkup*.

Don't dismiss subtle signs—catch loss early for an easier adjustment to helpful tools like hearing aids or assistive listening devices. Schedule a hearing exam today for customised care*. Your quality of life is worth protecting.



Now, what is hearing loss?

Hearing loss is defined as* ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’.

There are three types of hearing loss*: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed.


Types of hearing loss (1) (1).jpg
The three types of hearing loss and their causes. Image Credit: SDC



Levels of hearing loss

There are four clinical levels of hearing loss* (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).

The level of hearing loss is measured in decibels (dB). For reference, conversational speech is measured at around 65(dB).



Mild (26-40dB)
You may have difficulty hearing soft sounds like rustling leaves, a clock ticking or soft speech such as ‘s’, ‘t’, ‘th’ and ‘f’.

Moderate (41-70dB)
You may have difficulty following conversations, especially in noisy environments.

Severe (71-90dB)
You may have difficulty hearing the telephone ringing, the doorbell, or an alarm clock.

Profound (91dB or more)
Comprehending speech is very difficult, even with the help of amplification.

You may have difficulty hearing emergency vehicle sirens, fireworks or planes.



Signs of hearing loss*
  • You often ask people to repeat themselves.
  • You find it difficult to tell where a noise is coming from.
  • You may feel embarrassed when you meet new people as you struggle to hear them.
  • You feel tired or stressed (from concentrating intensely when you listen).
  • You struggle to follow group conversations.
  • You often miss hearing the doorbell or the phone ringing.
  • Your family and friends tell you that the TV or radio is too loud.
  • You hear a ringing or buzzing sound in one or both of your ears (tinnitus).
  • You feel frustrated when talking to people as you feel like you can hear them, but you can’t understand what they are saying.


Symptoms of hearing loss*
  • Increased difficulty in communicating.
  • Feeling stressed or tired from having to concentrate intensely.
  • Feeling bewildered, uncertain or a little fearful.
  • Feeling frustrated and blaming friends and family for not being able to hear them. It can often feel as though other people are mumbling.
  • Withdrawing from social situations.
  • Feeling angry, vulnerable and worried.
  • Health problems like depression and anxiety.
If you are struggling to hear day-to-day, speaking to an audiologist* and going for a hearing test* can help you to decide whether you need extra help like hearing aids or a cochlear implant. It’s also a great way to compare your hearing over time.

On average, it takes seven years after initial symptoms for people to seek help for hearing loss. It’s better to take action as soon as possible. You can do this by:


Key Takeaways

  • Millions of people worldwide are affected by hearing loss*, which is defined as ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’. There are three types of hearing loss: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed, and four clinical levels of hearing loss (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).
  • Many people may not realise they have hearing loss initially as symptoms can gradually manifest, making it difficult to detect. There are various signs of hearing loss*, including difficulties in following a group conversation, not hearing the doorbell or phone and the inability to hear higher frequencies.
  • The stages of hearing loss start from not realising there is a problem, then noticing hearing loss and feeling frustrated, taking action by consulting a healthcare provider*, getting a diagnosis, initiating a management plan, accepting the condition and finally, regular check-ins with a hearing healthcare provider to prevent further deterioration.

Getting the right treatment and help can feel daunting* but it is a great step towards a happier, less stressful, and more connected life.

It’s easy to get your hearing checked; simply fill in an appointment form*, and you will be matched with a specialist to conduct your free hearing test*.

Click here to book a free hearing test now*.

Members, it’s important to note that this article should not be taken as medical advice. Be sure to consider the advice of a professional before making any decisions.

How often do you get your hearing checked? How has the experience been? We’d love to hear from you, and you might even inspire other members to book their checkups!

*Please note, members, that this is a sponsored article. All content of ours that has an asterisk next to it means we may get a commission to write an article or post a deal. We do this to assist with the costs of running the SDC. Thank you!
 
Sponsored
What do you do when your partner has been diagnosed with hearing impairment and doesnt want to wear aids. Everything they do is loud, TV, Music, placing a plate on the kitchen bench (sounds to me that they have placed it down so hard that it almost breaks). When they speak they speak softly and I have difficulty hearing them. I fear that this constant bombardment of noise is going to effect my hearing.
 
I didn't realise how bad my hearing was in my left ear until my wife asked if l heard what she said as l drove with her in the passenger seat. I already had an aid in my right ear.
(I worked in a factory cutting aluminium components for windows & the left ear always faced the saw with 2 blades cutting a 45° angle together).
The 2 hearing aids l now wear makes life easier & less complaints from the wife.
 
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Reactions: DLHM

As we age, our hearing often changes gradually without us even realising it. But failing to notice the subtle signs of hearing loss* could have serious consequences.

But what exactly should you be looking out for? And how much is normal ageing versus a problem that requires attention? We did some research to learn the signs you cannot afford to brush aside*.



Are you struggling to hear in groups or noisy places? If conversations at family gatherings, events or restaurants are suddenly too challenging, it’s time for a checkup*.

Our ability to hear well in challenging environments diminishes as loss progresses, and catching loss early means treatments work better.

Has anyone ever told you that the television is blaring, but it sounds normal to you? One sign of degraded hearing is turning up the TV 'too loud’. Our brains compensate at first, so we may not perceive our own hearing loss. This is another sign that it’s time for a checkup*.

Don't dismiss subtle signs—catch loss early for an easier adjustment to helpful tools like hearing aids or assistive listening devices. Schedule a hearing exam today for customised care*. Your quality of life is worth protecting.



Now, what is hearing loss?

Hearing loss is defined as* ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’.

There are three types of hearing loss*: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed.


View attachment 34087
The three types of hearing loss and their causes. Image Credit: SDC



Levels of hearing loss

There are four clinical levels of hearing loss* (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).

The level of hearing loss is measured in decibels (dB). For reference, conversational speech is measured at around 65(dB).



Mild (26-40dB)
You may have difficulty hearing soft sounds like rustling leaves, a clock ticking or soft speech such as ‘s’, ‘t’, ‘th’ and ‘f’.

Moderate (41-70dB)
You may have difficulty following conversations, especially in noisy environments.

Severe (71-90dB)
You may have difficulty hearing the telephone ringing, the doorbell, or an alarm clock.

Profound (91dB or more)
Comprehending speech is very difficult, even with the help of amplification.

You may have difficulty hearing emergency vehicle sirens, fireworks or planes.



Signs of hearing loss*
  • You often ask people to repeat themselves.
  • You find it difficult to tell where a noise is coming from.
  • You may feel embarrassed when you meet new people as you struggle to hear them.
  • You feel tired or stressed (from concentrating intensely when you listen).
  • You struggle to follow group conversations.
  • You often miss hearing the doorbell or the phone ringing.
  • Your family and friends tell you that the TV or radio is too loud.
  • You hear a ringing or buzzing sound in one or both of your ears (tinnitus).
  • You feel frustrated when talking to people as you feel like you can hear them, but you can’t understand what they are saying.


Symptoms of hearing loss*
  • Increased difficulty in communicating.
  • Feeling stressed or tired from having to concentrate intensely.
  • Feeling bewildered, uncertain or a little fearful.
  • Feeling frustrated and blaming friends and family for not being able to hear them. It can often feel as though other people are mumbling.
  • Withdrawing from social situations.
  • Feeling angry, vulnerable and worried.
  • Health problems like depression and anxiety.
If you are struggling to hear day-to-day, speaking to an audiologist* and going for a hearing test* can help you to decide whether you need extra help like hearing aids or a cochlear implant. It’s also a great way to compare your hearing over time.

On average, it takes seven years after initial symptoms for people to seek help for hearing loss. It’s better to take action as soon as possible. You can do this by:


Key Takeaways

  • Millions of people worldwide are affected by hearing loss*, which is defined as ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’. There are three types of hearing loss: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed, and four clinical levels of hearing loss (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).
  • Many people may not realise they have hearing loss initially as symptoms can gradually manifest, making it difficult to detect. There are various signs of hearing loss*, including difficulties in following a group conversation, not hearing the doorbell or phone and the inability to hear higher frequencies.
  • The stages of hearing loss start from not realising there is a problem, then noticing hearing loss and feeling frustrated, taking action by consulting a healthcare provider*, getting a diagnosis, initiating a management plan, accepting the condition and finally, regular check-ins with a hearing healthcare provider to prevent further deterioration.

Getting the right treatment and help can feel daunting* but it is a great step towards a happier, less stressful, and more connected life.

It’s easy to get your hearing checked; simply fill in an appointment form*, and you will be matched with a specialist to conduct your free hearing test*.

Click here to book a free hearing test now*.

Members, it’s important to note that this article should not be taken as medical advice. Be sure to consider the advice of a professional before making any decisions.

How often do you get your hearing checked? How has the experience been? We’d love to hear from you, and you might even inspire other members to book their checkups!

*Please note, members, that this is a sponsored article. All content of ours that has an asterisk next to it means we may get a commission to write an article or post a deal. We do this to assist with the costs of running the SDC. Thank you!
Yep; something we all should do . Most , if not all hearing aid businesses do free a hearing test and often h/aid trail tests .
But ; be warned. Sadly; it does seem to be one of those easy to get ripped off industries . Like my around 94 year old mother at the time being sold $6000 aids with bells and whistle she didn't understand , need , or could use . . She died a couple of years later so if we were not able to get a full refund she would have paid around $500 month!! :( .
I have totally smashed up hearing that is still close to impossible to fix and my aids cost $2000 or there abouts. ''Bloom''ing (wink wink) great mob!
 
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As we age, our hearing often changes gradually without us even realising it. But failing to notice the subtle signs of hearing loss* could have serious consequences.

But what exactly should you be looking out for? And how much is normal ageing versus a problem that requires attention? We did some research to learn the signs you cannot afford to brush aside*.



Are you struggling to hear in groups or noisy places? If conversations at family gatherings, events or restaurants are suddenly too challenging, it’s time for a checkup*.

Our ability to hear well in challenging environments diminishes as loss progresses, and catching loss early means treatments work better.

Has anyone ever told you that the television is blaring, but it sounds normal to you? One sign of degraded hearing is turning up the TV 'too loud’. Our brains compensate at first, so we may not perceive our own hearing loss. This is another sign that it’s time for a checkup*.

Don't dismiss subtle signs—catch loss early for an easier adjustment to helpful tools like hearing aids or assistive listening devices. Schedule a hearing exam today for customised care*. Your quality of life is worth protecting.



Now, what is hearing loss?

Hearing loss is defined as* ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’.

There are three types of hearing loss*: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed.


View attachment 34087
The three types of hearing loss and their causes. Image Credit: SDC



Levels of hearing loss

There are four clinical levels of hearing loss* (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).

The level of hearing loss is measured in decibels (dB). For reference, conversational speech is measured at around 65(dB).



Mild (26-40dB)
You may have difficulty hearing soft sounds like rustling leaves, a clock ticking or soft speech such as ‘s’, ‘t’, ‘th’ and ‘f’.

Moderate (41-70dB)
You may have difficulty following conversations, especially in noisy environments.

Severe (71-90dB)
You may have difficulty hearing the telephone ringing, the doorbell, or an alarm clock.

Profound (91dB or more)
Comprehending speech is very difficult, even with the help of amplification.

You may have difficulty hearing emergency vehicle sirens, fireworks or planes.



Signs of hearing loss*
  • You often ask people to repeat themselves.
  • You find it difficult to tell where a noise is coming from.
  • You may feel embarrassed when you meet new people as you struggle to hear them.
  • You feel tired or stressed (from concentrating intensely when you listen).
  • You struggle to follow group conversations.
  • You often miss hearing the doorbell or the phone ringing.
  • Your family and friends tell you that the TV or radio is too loud.
  • You hear a ringing or buzzing sound in one or both of your ears (tinnitus).
  • You feel frustrated when talking to people as you feel like you can hear them, but you can’t understand what they are saying.


Symptoms of hearing loss*
  • Increased difficulty in communicating.
  • Feeling stressed or tired from having to concentrate intensely.
  • Feeling bewildered, uncertain or a little fearful.
  • Feeling frustrated and blaming friends and family for not being able to hear them. It can often feel as though other people are mumbling.
  • Withdrawing from social situations.
  • Feeling angry, vulnerable and worried.
  • Health problems like depression and anxiety.
If you are struggling to hear day-to-day, speaking to an audiologist* and going for a hearing test* can help you to decide whether you need extra help like hearing aids or a cochlear implant. It’s also a great way to compare your hearing over time.

On average, it takes seven years after initial symptoms for people to seek help for hearing loss. It’s better to take action as soon as possible. You can do this by:


Key Takeaways

  • Millions of people worldwide are affected by hearing loss*, which is defined as ‘a decrease in a person’s sensitivity to sound’. There are three types of hearing loss: Sensorineural, Conductive and Mixed, and four clinical levels of hearing loss (mild, moderate, severe, and profound).
  • Many people may not realise they have hearing loss initially as symptoms can gradually manifest, making it difficult to detect. There are various signs of hearing loss*, including difficulties in following a group conversation, not hearing the doorbell or phone and the inability to hear higher frequencies.
  • The stages of hearing loss start from not realising there is a problem, then noticing hearing loss and feeling frustrated, taking action by consulting a healthcare provider*, getting a diagnosis, initiating a management plan, accepting the condition and finally, regular check-ins with a hearing healthcare provider to prevent further deterioration.

Getting the right treatment and help can feel daunting* but it is a great step towards a happier, less stressful, and more connected life.

It’s easy to get your hearing checked; simply fill in an appointment form*, and you will be matched with a specialist to conduct your free hearing test*.

Click here to book a free hearing test now*.

Members, it’s important to note that this article should not be taken as medical advice. Be sure to consider the advice of a professional before making any decisions.

How often do you get your hearing checked? How has the experience been? We’d love to hear from you, and you might even inspire other members to book their checkups!

*Please note, members, that this is a sponsored article. All content of ours that has an asterisk next to it means we may get a commission to write an article or post a deal. We do this to assist with the costs of running the SDC. Thank you!
Unfortunately I suffer, I'm told of politicians hearing? i.e selective!!! which is the most severe form of hearing loss?
 
What do you do when your partner has been diagnosed with hearing impairment and doesnt want to wear aids. Everything they do is loud, TV, Music, placing a plate on the kitchen bench (sounds to me that they have placed it down so hard that it almost breaks). When they speak they speak softly and I have difficulty hearing them. I fear that this constant bombardment of noise is going to effect my hearing.
I bought my husband headphones for watching tv. He started wearing them best thing ever.
 
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What do you do when your partner has been diagnosed with hearing impairment and doesnt want to wear aids. Everything they do is loud, TV, Music, placing a plate on the kitchen bench (sounds to me that they have placed it down so hard that it almost breaks). When they speak they speak softly and I have difficulty hearing them. I fear that this constant bombardment of noise is going to effect my hearing.
I hear your problem; my husband wouldn't wear his hearing aids. He said they made him look old. :unsure:
I bought him headphones🎧 to make him trendy, peace and quiet.:giggle:
 
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Being a Boilermaker for entire working life, my hearing has deteriorated very badly.
"She who must be obeyed" has complained and complained. 🥵
I don't know what the problem is...
Am I missing something?? 🤷‍♂️
 
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I have had tinnitus for some years and just put up with it as the doctor had no answer for me. later I would answer the phone to one of my sons who had a loud voice and could barely hear him I asked that he speak up and he said he already was. I did not believe him. However, I decided to try using my right ear and found such a difference that I made an appointment with an Audiologist and now have hearing aids. I am struggling with them but they are supposed to help with the tinnitus. Time will tell
 
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I have had tinnitus for some years and just put up with it as the doctor had no answer for me. later I would answer the phone to one of my sons who had a loud voice and could barely hear him I asked that he speak up and he said he already was. I did not believe him. However, I decided to try using my right ear and found such a difference that I made an appointment with an Audiologist and now have hearing aids. I am struggling with them but they are supposed to help with the tinnitus. Time will tell
Hopefully that will be the answer for you.
 
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I bought my husband headphones for watching tv. He started wearing them best thing ever.
He has bought ear buds with noise canceling at his brother's recommendation. Wore them, stated they wee great. Wore them on two other occasions and now they live in their box. Our neighbours can now once more also enjoy listening to the ABC News without having to turn on their TVs.
 
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Reactions: DLHM
He has bought ear buds with noise canceling at his brother's recommendation. Wore them, stated they wee great. Wore them on two other occasions and now they live in their box. Our neighbours can now once more also enjoy listening to the ABC News without having to turn on their TVs.
As I said I bought headphones, for this reason, I worked in aged care and saw the issues.
I could visibly see when he wasn't using them simply passed them to him and bingo, they were on.
I think sometimes people just forget, especially men. Get them out and leave on the side to remind him, it should become habit.
Goodluck ;)
 
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See my post above and scroll up a bit 🔝 I had three appts at a hearing specialist, each time after the talk
She put me in a sound proof box with earphones on, after 5 minutes she opened the door and pointed to a chair.
She then proceeded to identify my hearing problems and said "you failed the hearing test miserably".
I countered with "how could I have possibly failed when I didn't hear the bloody questions, she said
"they weren't questions they were sounds of different pitches and volumes
I rest my case"
I knew they were sounds { was just be smart } SERIOUSLY the TINNITUS I have is that bad I cant hear a damn thing with earphones on as they exacerbate my condition.
P.S. I can't wear hearing aids as they irritate me some what rotten much to the chagrin of ""She Who Must Be Obeyed""!
 
See my post above and scroll up a bit 🔝 I had three appts at a hearing specialist, each time after the talk
She put me in a sound proof box with earphones on, after 5 minutes she opened the door and pointed to a chair.
She then proceeded to identify my hearing problems and said "you failed the hearing test miserably".
I countered with "how could I have possibly failed when I didn't hear the bloody questions, she said
"they weren't questions they were sounds of different pitches and volumes
I rest my case"
I knew they were sounds { was just be smart } SERIOUSLY the TINNITUS I have is that bad I cant hear a damn thing with earphones on as they exacerbate my condition.
P.S. I can't wear hearing aids as they irritate me some what rotten much to the chagrin of ""She Who Must Be Obeyed""!
I went to the soundproof box with my husband, I understand what you're saying. You asked were you missing something, so I tried to help you with some information. I am very sorry if this upset you, it must be very frustrating for you to have this problem. My husband was a boiler maker as well, he found it very difficult to hear as he got older. Unfortunately, when you don't have the problem, yourself it can be hard to cope with the extra level of sound your partner needs. It takes a lot of love and patience to cope with each other's issues. Tinnitus is a cruel and debilitating issue on its own without the complication of hearing loss. I hope things improve for you.
 
I went to the soundproof box with my husband, I understand what you're saying. You asked were you missing something, so I tried to help you with some information. I am very sorry if this upset you, it must be very frustrating for you to have this problem. My husband was a boiler maker as well, he found it very difficult to hear as he got older. Unfortunately, when you don't have the problem, yourself it can be hard to cope with the extra level of sound your partner needs. It takes a lot of love and patience to cope with each other's issues. Tinnitus is a cruel and debilitating issue on its own without the complication of hearing loss. I hope things improve for you.
Thankyou, Chancieblue.
They say hearing aids provide background noise to help cancel Tinnitus, doesn't work for me..
 

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